Landscaping, Lifestyle

What to Plant in Your Garden (By Region)

You don’t need a green thumb to grow a beautiful garden in your Progress Residential® home. Keep reading to see which plants would thrive in your backyard – it’s all based on your region’s native soil and weather conditions.

Southwest (NV and AZ)
In order to survive and thrive in the spring and summer temperatures typical in the Southwest, we suggest planting Agave, Yucca, various types of Cacti and wildflowers. These types of plants do not need much water and appreciate the ample sunshine, dry soil and heat that this region of the country offers.

Agave – not only does it look beautiful in a desert landscaped backyard but Agave can also be used as a sugar alternative. Also known as the “century plant,” Agave does produce flowers, but usually only once. Agave thrives in dry, sand-like soil and only needs to be watered once every week or two.
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Yucca – looks somewhat similar to the Agave but the Yucca has thinner leaves and grows taller. When the Yucca flowers once a year, it produces beautiful white, bell-shaped flowers. Yucca grows well in full sun and well-draining soil. Be sure to wear gloves when pruning back older leaves – they’re sharp!
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Wildflowers – there are countless varieties of wildflowers that would flourish in a desert landscape. Click here to explore the types of wildflowers, based on color, that would fit into your garden best. Wildflowers need direct sunlight for 5-8 hours a day and sandy, well-draining soil.
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South and Midwest (IN, NC TN and TX)
With richer soil and more moisture in the air than in the Southwest, the plants that thrive in the South and Midwest vary greatly from their desert counterparts. You’ll be able to enjoy colorful blooms from these flowering plants that are native to this part of the country.

Azalea – native to NC, TN and east Texas, Azaleas are gorgeous additions to any garden or flower bed. You’ll love seeing the light white and pink blooms in spring when given the right care: partial shade and rich, moist soil.
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Sweetshrub – growing natively throughout the Southeast and Midwest, the beautiful and expansive Sweetshrub, known as Calycanthus floridus, blooms beautiful red flowers amidst its rich green leaves. The best part about the Sweetshrub, however, is its amazing scent: fruity, spicy and sweet all in one flower. The Sweetshrub grows best in sun or partial shade and in rich, moist soil.
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Oakleaf Hydrangea – native to Tennessee, the Oakleaf Hydrangea grows well in the South and displays creamy white flowers that mature to more of a rich pink until about fall. The Oakleaf Hydrangea can thrive in sun or shade and grows into a stunning medium-sized shrub.
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Southeast (GA and FL)
The humidity and sunshine in the Southeast allows for tropical plants and flowers that would not do as well in other climates. Gardeners in Georgia and Florida are able to enjoy both structured green bushes as well as beautifully bright flowers.

Crested Iris – with delicate blue, white or purple flowers, the Crested Iris is a great addition to any spring garden. Often blooming in late spring, this plant thrives in partial sun or shade and needs moist, well-drained soil.
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Saw Palmetto – most present in Florida, this tropical-looking plant grows well even in tough conditions. It is drought tolerant and grows best in full sun and dry soil.
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Pitcher Plant – known for their unique, almost alien-looking flower, the Pitcher Plant, or Sarracenia purpea, are native to swampy areas but grow well elsewhere as long as they have moist soil and full sun. This plant will add great color and variety to your garden.
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Let us know in the comments below if you plan to do some spring gardening and which region you live in! Have a great photo of your flourishing garden? Tag us on social media @ProgressResidential.

 

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